The City Planning Division has been working on a range of initiatives to extend our housing supply through the Expanding Housing Options in Neighbourhoods (EHON) work program. This plan expands upon recent work that’s supported laneway suites. As Bloor West Village has plenty of laneways, this program is quite relevant.

Laneway Housing in Toronto | Laneway Houses, Homes in Toronto

A new report has been published which can be found here. In it, the City looks at options for laneway type units (known as Garden Suites) for homes that aren’t on laneways.

This type of home too, features prominently in Bloor West Village. According to the report, City Planning will consult with interested stakeholders on potential permissions for Garden Suites in the City of Toronto during the first quarter of 2021 and then report to Planning and Housing Committee with recommendations by the end of June 2021 on findings and next steps. Stay tuned.

Ontario Place is technically not part of Bloor West Village but we’re guessing many Bloor Street West residents enjoy the grounds of Ontario Place and perhaps even have fond memories of the park from when they were younger.

An we’re guessing you probably didn’t know it came close to being considered a property not worth preserving. That has changed as of this week, thanks to the efforts of Ontario Place For All. Read more about this exciting update here.

As we’ve mentioned in an earlier post, Toronto has nearly 300 KM of laneways (that’s nearly the distance to North Bay). If you are in Bloor West, there’s a good chance you back on to one.

The Laneway Project in Toronto has published this great resource to assist you in getting the most from your unique property. It’s worth having a look and will likely offer you great information and insights you hadn’t thought of.

And, possibly put money in your pocket.

On Energy Efficiency Day, Reflecting on Why I Chose a Career in Energy  Efficiency! - DNV GL Blog - Energy in Transition

BetterHomesTO was created by the City to help homeowners take steps to improve the comfort and efficiency of their homes and reduce the emissions that contribute to climate change.

Why is that important? Because improving the energy efficiency of their homes may be the biggest thing residents can do to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Homes and buildings generate about half of the GHG emissions in Toronto today.

BetterHomesTO offers a one-stop website (BetterHomesTO.ca) that makes it easy for residents to find information, tips and resources to help them take action.

You may or may not know, but Bloor Street Village is home to several kilometres of laneways. Toronto has 295 KM in total (yes, that’s correct). And these laneways often offer a glimpse of neighbourhood history, with the backs of homes and businesses sometimes more interesting than the front. A good way to explore is to check Google Maps and look for long, straight “roads” that aren’t named. Chances are, they’re laneways (there’s a nice long one running parallel to Jane Street, north from Colbeck Street.)

Note also that if your home abuts a laneway, your property could be one of 48,000 in the City that qualify for the two-year old incentive program. You can read more here.

We’ve all walked past this ugly lot on the corner of Bloor Street West and Harcroft Road on our way to High Park or whilst running errands in the eastern boundary of the village. Good news: it will soon be developed.

Following many years of uncertainty about the future redevelopment of the property, a new mixed-use mid-rise building is proceeding toward final approval with the City.  This proposal is essentially the same as the building originally negotiated with a community working group in 2015, and it’s gratifying to note that it’s massing and architecture will be consistent with the other recent re-developments east of Glendonwynne Road.  Also, this condominium will be offering an unusually large number of 2 bedroom and hard-to-find 3 bedroom units for young family’s and empty-nesters who are looking to stay in the village.

We at the BWVRA were initially approached in 2015 by the original Developer for feedback on its original proposal. At our recommendation, a working group was then organized with concerned residents of Harcroft Road ( in which BWVRA also participated), and we also provided technical support and encouragement to the group, based on our experience with several earlier re-developments along the same section of Bloor Street.

For information on the development, including additional renderings, please click here.

We all know that High Park is a busy destination, especially now. In an effort to ease access and as part of the City’s ActiveTO projects, the park will be closed to vehicles on weekends (Friday nights to Monday mornings) to allow people to enjoy more outdoor space while being able to practice safe physical distancing. Bicycles are permitted.

There will also be updates to water filling stations and washrooms, as per this link.

High Park | Planet Traveler

It begins with a girl named Abbey. Abbey was a strong, brave, and tenacious 9-year old girl whose life was cut far too short in 2018 by a rare blood disorder. In her memory, Abbey’s family and friends created a charitable organization called Abbey’s Goal; click here to read more about Abbey and her amazing legacy.

In response to COVID-19, Abbey’s family started a rainbow revolution. They are making rainbow tree kits, which you can use to decorate a tree (or anything, really) in your front yard to show appreciation for essential workers and health heroes. If you would like to order a kit, you can text: 647-278-5140 and donate online at www.abbeysgoal.com.

Abbey’s Goal is suggesting a donation of $20 for this kit, which is home-made. All proceeds from the rainbow kits go to the Stop (thestop.org), an organization focused on increasing access to healthy food.

Doug Ford on Twitter: "I want to thank Abbey's Goal for this ...