After more than four years in the planning stages that included extensive community consultations, the Bijou Condo development is close to final approval at City Hall, and demolition of the block of buildings west of the former Humber Theatre is expected to start soon, with the former theatre building to follow.

When completed, this 12 storey re-development will include:

  • 4,938 m2 of retail commercial space on  two levels, (with allowance for at least one mid-size retail store such as a supermarket)
  • 18,470 m2 of residential condominiums above consisting of 79  one bedroom units, 84 two bedroom units and 23 three bedroom units- 266 parking spaces underground.

To get the latest updates, visit here and enter in the property address (2442 Bloor Street West), then go to Application Details.

The City Planning Division has been working on a range of initiatives to extend our housing supply through the Expanding Housing Options in Neighbourhoods (EHON) work program. This plan expands upon recent work that’s supported laneway suites. As Bloor West Village has plenty of laneways, this program is quite relevant.

Laneway Housing in Toronto | Laneway Houses, Homes in Toronto

A new report has been published which can be found here. In it, the City looks at options for laneway type units (known as Garden Suites) for homes that aren’t on laneways.

This type of home too, features prominently in Bloor West Village. According to the report, City Planning will consult with interested stakeholders on potential permissions for Garden Suites in the City of Toronto during the first quarter of 2021 and then report to Planning and Housing Committee with recommendations by the end of June 2021 on findings and next steps. Stay tuned.

Ontario Place is technically not part of Bloor West Village but we’re guessing many Bloor Street West residents enjoy the grounds of Ontario Place and perhaps even have fond memories of the park from when they were younger.

An we’re guessing you probably didn’t know it came close to being considered a property not worth preserving. That has changed as of this week, thanks to the efforts of Ontario Place For All. Read more about this exciting update here.

With new information coming out daily, it is difficult to know where to turn to make sure our views are heard on how we can rebuild a fairer, more just Toronto.

As the City prepares to release its 2021 budget in early January, every voice is critical to make sure the issues we care about are acted upon as we move forward. Housing, the environment, public transportation, and child care will all be up for debate as the City tries to find a path forward. By working together we can strengthen our voice to ensure no one is left behind.

Join me on Monday, December 7 at 6:30 pm, as I welcome both local and city-wide leaders and activists to discuss how we organize in these unprecedented times. This is going to be a great opportunity for you to be able to share your thoughts and ideas during this troubling time, and ahead of the City’s 2021 budget. 

You can register for my virtual town hall at gordperks.ca/register/ .

As we’ve mentioned in an earlier post, Toronto has nearly 300 KM of laneways (that’s nearly the distance to North Bay). If you are in Bloor West, there’s a good chance you back on to one.

The Laneway Project in Toronto has published this great resource to assist you in getting the most from your unique property. It’s worth having a look and will likely offer you great information and insights you hadn’t thought of.

And, possibly put money in your pocket.

On Energy Efficiency Day, Reflecting on Why I Chose a Career in Energy  Efficiency! - DNV GL Blog - Energy in Transition

BetterHomesTO was created by the City to help homeowners take steps to improve the comfort and efficiency of their homes and reduce the emissions that contribute to climate change.

Why is that important? Because improving the energy efficiency of their homes may be the biggest thing residents can do to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Homes and buildings generate about half of the GHG emissions in Toronto today.

BetterHomesTO offers a one-stop website (BetterHomesTO.ca) that makes it easy for residents to find information, tips and resources to help them take action.

You may or may not know, but Bloor Street Village is home to several kilometres of laneways. Toronto has 295 KM in total (yes, that’s correct). And these laneways often offer a glimpse of neighbourhood history, with the backs of homes and businesses sometimes more interesting than the front. A good way to explore is to check Google Maps and look for long, straight “roads” that aren’t named. Chances are, they’re laneways (there’s a nice long one running parallel to Jane Street, north from Colbeck Street.)

Note also that if your home abuts a laneway, your property could be one of 48,000 in the City that qualify for the two-year old incentive program. You can read more here.

Those who travel north on Runnymede Road from Runnymede Station may have noticed a missing bus stop just north of the station, that served 71 and 79 buses. This has been an inconvenience, we’ve heard. According to one resident, the TTC are currently evaluating the long term status of this stop as part of a comprehensive review of stops at this station and the Bloor Street intersection.

We will share more information when we have it.

En Route: TTC 71A Runnymede via St. Clair | SB | 1033 - YouTube

We’ve all walked past this ugly lot on the corner of Bloor Street West and Harcroft Road on our way to High Park or whilst running errands in the eastern boundary of the village. Good news: it will soon be developed.

Following many years of uncertainty about the future redevelopment of the property, a new mixed-use mid-rise building is proceeding toward final approval with the City.  This proposal is essentially the same as the building originally negotiated with a community working group in 2015, and it’s gratifying to note that it’s massing and architecture will be consistent with the other recent re-developments east of Glendonwynne Road.  Also, this condominium will be offering an unusually large number of 2 bedroom and hard-to-find 3 bedroom units for young family’s and empty-nesters who are looking to stay in the village.

We at the BWVRA were initially approached in 2015 by the original Developer for feedback on its original proposal. At our recommendation, a working group was then organized with concerned residents of Harcroft Road ( in which BWVRA also participated), and we also provided technical support and encouragement to the group, based on our experience with several earlier re-developments along the same section of Bloor Street.

For information on the development, including additional renderings, please click here.